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How can you tell how old a cat is

How can you tell how old a cat is


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How can you tell how old a cat is?

A:

The best way is with the teeth - if they are worn down at the gum line the cat is well past its prime.

A:

Some cats grow teeth as they get older, some never do (my Mom's Tabby has never got a new one!).

You may find it helpful to look at the cat's head, especially their eyes.

A cat's head can be examined with a mirror to determine the age of the cat.

The first line of demarcation between adult and juvenile cats is the eyelids, or lids.

The lids of adult cats usually appear dark, glossy, and well defined with no yellowish coloration.

They may have small folds that look like fur lines, and appear to be black.

Juvenile cat lids are usually less developed and appear more yellowish in color.

Their eyes are also different. Adult cats' eyes are round, while juvenile cat eyes can be described as square or more triangular.

Some cats grow teeth later than others

Cat age can be estimated by examining the teeth of a cat. The

first line of demarcation between adult and juvenile cats is the

eyelids, or lids.

The lids of adult cats usually appear dark, glossy, and well defined

with no yellowish coloration.

They may have small folds that look like fur lines, and appear to be

black.

Juvenile cat lids are usually less developed and appear more

yellowish in color.

Their eyes are also different. Adult cats' eyes are round, while

juvenile cat eyes can be described as square or more triangular.

A:

Well, not really an answer but...

A lot of cats, but most likely most cats, don't get new teeth.

My Siamese had an upper tooth that broke off when she was just 4 months old. When she was a year and half she lost her first lower tooth. So, I guess we're down to about 2 teeth on either side. So, if you look at your cat's mouth in a mirror (or better, if you're close enough to see the teeth), you can determine that the cat is older than 12 months.

My Siamese has no teeth, though. She has a long and pointy snout and just a few teeth on the back of her gums, so she has to make up for her lack of teeth by having extra skin on her tongue. I think she also has a lot more hair.

On the other hand, there are some cats that get new teeth every year or every other year.

You'll have to decide what kind of cat you have. If you've decided that your cat has teeth, you'll have to look at their teeth to decide if you can figure out how old they are.

Here are a few pictures of the inside of a cat's mouth:

Here, a normal cat.

Here, a Siamese.

Here, a black cat.

Here, a gray cat.

Here, a black and white cat.

A:

The easiest way to tell the age of a cat is the age of the teeth. For example, a 3 month old cat has six teeth in the front and the other four are hidden. The two on the bottom are called the incisors, the ones in the middle are called the canines, and the two on the top are called the premolars and molars. The cat is about three months old when the first incisors appear, and the first premolars appear about 2.5 months later. The canines and the first molars will appear about a month later, and the rest will appear about 2.5 months after that.

There are no markings on the top of the gum line to help you determine the age of the cat, however, the number of teeth is still a good indicator of the age of the cat. The cat in the above picture has a very good number of teeth, she has eight front teeth, four canine, two premolars, and four molars. It is estimated that most cats have between 3 and 6 of each tooth, except for the molars. Most adult cats only have two molars. The molars have a long, blunt


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