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George rodrigue blue dog

George rodrigue blue dog


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George rodrigue blue dog

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Get the Facts. Join the discussion. Add your opinion. Weigh in on the topics that matter to you. All politics. All the time.

The "Blue Dog" caucus is a caucus within the United States House of Representatives. It is one of three caucuses within the Democratic Party, the others being the Blue Dogs and the New Democrat Coalition. In 2006, the party had 22 members, all from the Republican-leaning district of Washington, D. C.. However, when Democratic Representatives Jim Cooper and Christopher Shays decided not to seek re-election in November, the caucus had only ten members.

After the 2010 census, the Democrats have gained ten seats in the House of Representatives, bringing the caucus to 24 members.

There are several theories as to why the term "Blue Dog" was coined. Some believe it was created by a Republican to describe Democrats from the South who had no intention of voting for the Republican party.[1] Others believe the term "Blue Dog" has been used since the 1940s as a derogatory term for liberals,[2] and have cited statements by Richard Nixon (including at a 1970 press conference),[3] as well as the actions of the late RepresentativeJohn Joseph "Jack" Mooney. Nixon said that he wanted Democrats in the South to be called "Blue Dogs" rather than "Democrats."[4] Nixon's actions included making the following statement, "We don't want to be labeled with the Blue Dog Party, that's for damn sure,"[4] and Mooney's actions included taking a "blue dog" as his campaign mascot.[3]

The Blue Dogs are a caucus of twenty-four Democrats in the United States House of Representatives, named for the color of their dog tags.[1][5] All of the Democrats are Republicans who had been defeated in the 2006 elections and who are now in tough reelection fights. The term Blue Dog was coined by House Majority Leader and Minority Leader[6] Steny Hoyer (D-Maryland). He coined the term to mean, "Democrats who are in tough races, but not impossible."[6]

The Blue Dog Caucus was established in January 2005, following the Democrats' loss of control of Congress following the 2004 presidential election. The Caucus was founded to give some support and representation to these Members of Congress in their upcoming elections.[5] Many of the Blue Dogs who ran for reelection are running in states that supported George W. Bush over John Kerry in the 2004 presidential election.[6]

As of February 2008[update], there were 22 Democrats and two Independents who had formed the Blue Dogs Caucus. Some of the Democrats, including Representative John B. Larson, had lost their reelection bids. The two independents, Representatives John Sullivan and Joseph Cao, were both seeking re-election.[6] However, Cao did not make the ballot in the November 4, 2008 election.[7]

The term "Blue Dog" is thought to have been coined in the 1940s by the RepublicanRichard Nixon as a "dog whistle" to appeal to Southern Democrats.[1][8][9]

For the purposes of the caucus, any member of Congress is eligible. Members are chosen by the Caucus leaders and by the individual candidates for each district, based upon several factors. The Caucus leaders have final say on who is chosen.

Caucus membership is generally reserved for Members who are either vulnerable or in a district that is Republican leaning. Members are chosen to make sure there is representation for each of the states within the Caucus's jurisdiction.

Caucus members are elected at the first meeting, the first week of the 110th Congress, January 4, 2005.

The Blue Dog Caucus is not an official Congressional caucus, it is not part of the Democratic or Republican leadership, it does not have its own website, there is no official membership roll, and it does not have official standing within the Congress.

The term "Blue Dog" is thought to have been coined in the 1940s by the RepublicanRichard Nixon as a "dog whistle" to appeal to Southern Democrats.[1][8][9]

For the purposes of the Caucus, any member of Congress is eligible. Members are chosen by the Caucus leaders and by the individual candidates for each district, based upon several factors. The Caucus leaders have final say on who is chosen.

Caucus membership is generally reserved for Members who are either vulnerable or in a district that is Republican leaning. Members are chosen to make sure there is representation for each of the states within the Caucus's jurisdiction.

Caucus members are elected at the first meeting, the first week of the 110th Congress, January 4, 2005.

The Blue Dog Caucus is not an official Congressional caucus, it is not part of the Democratic or Republican leadership, it does not have its own website, there is no official membership roll, and it does not have official standing within the Congress.

The term "Blue Dog" is thought to have been coined in the 1940s by the RepublicanRichard Nixon as a "dog whistle" to appeal to Southern Democrats.[1][8][9]

For the purposes of the Caucus, any member of Congress is eligible. Members are chosen by the Caucus leaders and by the individual candidates for each district, based upon several factors. The Caucus leaders have final say on who is chosen.

Caucus membership is generally reserved for Members who are either vulnerable or in a district that is Republican leaning. Members are chosen to make sure there is representation for each of the states within the Caucus's jurisdiction.

Caucus members are elected at the first meeting, the first week of the 110th Congress, January 4, 2005.

The Blue Dog Caucus is not an official Congressional caucus, it is not part of the Democratic or Republican leadership, it does not have its own website, there is no official membership roll, and it does not have official standing within the Congress.

The term "Blue Dog" is thought to have been coined in the 1940s by the RepublicanRichard Nixon as a "dog whistle" to


Watch the video: Top 10 Blue Dog Breeds (May 2022).

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