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Why do adult cats only meow in humans?


The meowing of their cats is well known to humans, whereby adult fur noses mainly communicate with each other with physical signals. From time to time there are hissing, screeching or rumbling among other people, but the "meow" is reserved for the bipeds. "Meow!": This cat wants to tell something to its human - Shutterstock / maradon 333

Cats are very intelligent, no cat lover has any doubts about that. With meowing, the clever velvet paws have even become accustomed to a language that is reserved only for us humans. Find out where that comes from here.

Among themselves, cats mainly use body language

When two cats meet, they mainly communicate about subtle signs of body language that humans probably would not even notice. They also send signals about smells that their peers perceive and then interpret through pleading. In social behavior, mating behavior and territory behavior, there are sophisticated processes that may seem like dances to human eyes. But cats know every movement, every change in facial expressions exactly. Sounds can also be mixed into cat communication, but these are rather rare and essentially only come into play when body language and other "non-verbal" signals are insufficient.

If cats meow all the time - why is that?

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Meowing in humans comes from the age of kittens

Cats use meow to tell people that they want something. Whether they are hungry, want to greet their two-legged friends or be petted, whether they want to go outside or inside or whether they are missing something, they cannot convey to the "stupid" people using body language alone. Fur noses learn this very quickly and notice that we communicate a lot with them about sounds. So they approach me with the meowing, so to speak, and adjust a little to the way we communicate.

By the way, as cats all cats meow. Kittens use it to call their mother when they are hungry or feel alone. Your cat mom then knows how to meet the needs of her kittens. Adult cats that live in the wild usually get used to meowing again because they don't need it among their peers. But it proves to be practical for cat-human communication.